Acclaimed professor marks one-month deadline for Tilley Award entries

Date published: 03 December 2018 14:50
Dated: 03 December 2018 11:48:56

Professor Nick Tilley has publically encouraged police forces and partners to submit their entries to the 2018/19 Tilley Awards in a newly released short video.

The video, released today to mark the one-month countdown until the deadline of the 2018/19 Tilley Awards, features the renowned problem solving expert recapping on previous entries,  discussing the application process and the types of projects that can be submitted.

The Tilley Awards, which close for entries on Monday 31 December, were re-launched this year by the Problem Solving and Demand Reduction programme, after a period of eight years without them. The programme, led by South Yorkshire Police on behalf of all forces, reintroduced the awards as a part of its work to transform ways of working across the police and partners at a local, regional and national level, by embedding problem solving as a core discipline.

Professor Nick Tilley said: “We are within a month of the deadline for submitting a Tilley Award entry, and I can’t wait to see what comes in. Over the years I’ve been lucky enough to hear about some fantastic achievements - police and partners working out what to do to deal with knotty problems that have resisted conventional policing responses - where systematic and sustained attention, trying something different, has paid off.

“What we are looking for now are initiatives that address specific problems, which have persisted in spite of normal police responses. Careful analysis has helped identify potential pinch-points to remove, reduce, or alleviate the harms and hence contain calls for service; strategies have been devised and implemented successfully; and there is robust evidence of achievement. As I say, I’ve seen previous examples. They are inspiring and instructive. They are worth celebrating. Do submit entries for the Tilley Award when you’ve been involved in this kind of work.”

Assistant Chief Constable of South Yorkshire Police Lauren Poultney, said: “This video by Nick Tilley highlights the importance of problem orientated projects being shared and celebrated. Not only do the awards recognise projects that successfully address local community issues and those involved in these, they also act as a way of sharing best practice amongst other forces and partners.

“As the deadline for final entries draws ever closer, I would encourage anyone involved in problem solving projects to submit an entry to this year’s awards. I’m looking forward to finding out about the work taking place across the country and I would like to wish everyone submitting an entry to this year’s awards the best of luck.”

This year the awards are broken down into five categories: Neighbourhoods, Police Now, Investigations, Partners, and Business Support and Volunteers. A winner for each category will be chosen, which will become one of the five finalists for the overall awards. Each of these finalists will present their projects to the judging panel and audience at the National Problem Solving Conference in March 2019, where an overall winner will be chosen.

The winner of the 2018/19 Tilley Awards will be automatically submitted to the Goldstein Awards, and the successful entrant will be given the opportunity to attend the international conference in America.

To download a copy of the application form and guidance before the deadline closes, please visit the Problem Solving and Demand Reduction website here- https://www.southyorkshire.police.uk/find-out/problem-solving-and-demand-reduction-programme/ or email Tilley_Awards@southyorks.pnn.police.uk

Entrants can also submit questions and project draft narratives to a panel of advisors, made up of experts working within problem solving roles from both police forces and public sector organisations, to gain feedback and guidance on their applications. Information and details of how this process works is explained in the guidance document on the Problem Solving and Demand Reduction website.

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